When I posted this recipe for Chocolate Avocado Pudding on my Facebook page it was crazy popular, and when people like something they like to share, so I’m sharing with you here just as folks on Facebook shared my recipe with their friends on Facebook, and so on and so on…

 

 It doesn’t get much easier than this pudding. The biggest hurdle with this recipe is finding that elusive just-right avocado, that is not too hard, but not so soft that it’s starting to turn brown. It’s the Goldilocks syndrome, of not too hard, not too soft, but juuuust right! Unfortunately, there’s a fine line and small window between peak ripeness and the beginning of the rotting process.

 

Do you know how you can tell if an avocado is ripe when you buy it? Avocados do not ripen until picked, so some of the avocadoes on store shelves may be under-ripe. Often, we look to the color of the skin, but that may not be the best indicator of ripeness. Those bright green avocados are usually under-ripe, but sometimes the darker color ones are also not yet ripe. A ripe avocado should be slightly soft and yield to slight pressure from your hand but should not be mushy. It may have a darker color, but the color may vary. Another way to tell if an avocado is ripe is to pop the tiny stem off.  If it doesn’t come off easily, the avocado is not yet ripe. If it comes off easily and has a nice green color underneath the avocado is ripe. If it’s brown underneath the stem the avocado is too ripe, and you might find brown spots in your avocado when you cut it open. If you’re buying an avocado for a few days down the road you can go ahead and choose one that is still a bit hard (but not rock hard) and let it ripen at home. You can soften an avocado at home in a few days (3-5) by placing it in a brown paper bag or old newspaper along with an apple or a banana.

 

Once you cut into an avocado it turns brown fairly quickly for the same reason that an apple, banana or potato turns brown, because it contains an enzyme called polyphenol oxidase that causes browning (oxidation) with exposure to air. That is why it is best to keep the pit attached of you’re not using all of the avocado at once, to keep the piece that is under the pit protected from air and therefore oxidation aka browning. Another recommended trick is to  squeeze lemon or lime juice on the exposed piece to protect it from oxidation and browning for a day or so (You can try this with guacamole as well), although leaving in the pit is the method with which I’ve had the best success.

 

So, if you were successful and managed to acquire the perfect ripe avocado, this recipe is a five-minute easy-breezy recipe in your food processor. It can even be eaten as breakfast. Chocolate pudding for breakfast…seriously? Yep! My sister, who is not so fond of food prep, called me one morning and said she didn’t know what to have for breakfast and everything was too much trouble. I suggested this and a few minutes later she texted me a photo of the pudding with an accompanying message “made…and gone! Thanks!”

 

We like to use this delicious recipe as a dip and serve it with fresh strawberries, or banana or orange slices.

Chocolate Avocado Pudding

When I posted this recipe for Chocolate Avocado Pudding on my Facebook page it was crazy popular, and when people like something they like to share, so I’m sharing with you here just as folks on Facebook shared my recipe with their friends on Facebook, and so on and so on... 
Prep Time 10 mins
Total Time 10 mins
Course Dessert

Ingredients
  

  • 1 ripe avocado
  • 1 ripe banana
  • 1/4 cup cacao powder
  • 1/2 cup almond milk

Instructions
 

  • Add all ingredients to food processor and processor until pudding consistency is reached. 
Keyword Chocolate